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CASE STUDIES

  • One layer of Green Glue can eliminate up to 90 percent of noise from penetrating a wall, ceiling or floor

Build Quiet Rooms, Don’t Make Rooms Quiet

 
In the world of acoustics and soundproofing, specialists abound. Coming in during the last stages of construction or renovation, these sound gurus bring their acoustical expertise to bear on what is essentially a finished room or building. The walls are framed, the floors are in place, and most of the heavy lifting is done – at this point the specialist enters to advise on which soundproofing products the contractor should use.
 
For Yanky Drew, founder of TMSoundproofing, this approach is akin to closing the barn door after the horse has bolted.
 
“The goal should always be to build a room that’s quiet – not to go into a finished structure and only then start thinking about reducing noise,” Drew explains. “It’s vital to work with contractors at the very start of a project – the earlier in the process you use soundproofing technologies, the better result you can achieve.”
 
Drew’s first client for TMSoundproofing was the Beit Shvidler Conference Center, a small luxury hotel in Monsey, NY. With only 25 rooms, the hotel had built its reputation around quality, service, and exclusivity and was now looking to soundproof its rooms to enhance guests’ experiences. Drew decided to choose a simple approach – each room was soundproofed with Resilient Sound Clips on one side and Green Glue Noiseproofing Compound on the other. When Drew came back to test sound levels, he found a significant reduction in the noise transmitted between rooms.
 
The real proof came later on, when a foreman was contracted to take out an adjoining door between rooms in the same hotel and fill it in so that it was flush with the existing wall. It took five layers drywall to fill in the gap, but even this much drywall couldn’t compete with TMSoundproofing’s solution.
 
“Despite those five layers of drywall, he could still hear music in the adjoining room when passing the filled-in door,” Drew remembers. “When he passed the walls we’d treated– he heard nothing.”
 
TMSoundproofing is now an authorized dealer of the Green Glue technologies. “I always tell our customers that they shouldn’t look at the Green Glue products as individual ways to soundproof a room –instead to think of Green Glue as a noiseproofing system,” Drew explains.
 
Attention to detail, Drew explains, is critical. And understanding how the Green Glue products work as a complete system has enabled him to work through and offer solutions to problems that contractors face in construction and renovation.
 
“When we were brought in to soundproof entire floors or buildings, we’d find that even if we treated the floors and ceilings, noise would still escape. It was a mystery at first, until I started working on the projects much earlier in the construction process. Then the problem became obvious to me – although we were soundproofing the floors, we weren’t doing anything to the floors that ran under the walls,” says Drew. “Those bits were completely untreated and the sound was traveling smoothly down between floors.”
 
Drew realized at once that he needed to get in front of builders before they ever began framing the walls. At that point, he was able to have them install two layers of subfloor – with Green Glue in between – that ran across the whole building. Once the walls were framed, the noise was gone as sound would still travel down the wall but each time the subfloor stopped it from crossing over into the room above or below.
 
Drew’s hands-on experience in the field has led him conclude that professional soundproofing shouldn’t be just about going into an existing room and finding ways to reduce the noise. “We need to be there at the start of construction to make sure we are building quiet rooms,” he notes.